Whole Lotta Love, by Led Zeppelin – How to Play

whole lotta loveEven though the steady picking pattern will most likely prove to be challenging, this a great song for beginners as well as experienced players to learn how to play.

Whole Lotta Love, by Led Zeppelin, was released in 1969, as part of their second record, Led Zeppelin II. This song includes a middle section that features extensive studio experimentation by Jimmy Page and engineer Eddie Kramer. If you listen closely, you can hear a Theremin instrument being played, as well as loosened guitar strings being pulled tight. Continue reading “Whole Lotta Love, by Led Zeppelin – How to Play”

How to Play Roxanne by The Police

roxanneRoxanne, the very popular first single by The Police, helped make  them a household name. But with only two main sections to learn, it’s is a very easy song to play.

This time we take a look at the song “Roxanne” by The Police. This song was written by Sting in 1978 for their debut album “Outlandos d’Amour.” This was the first single and it helped make The Police a household name. You can hear Sting accidentally sit on a Piano and laugh in the very beginning. With only two main sections to learn, this is a very easy song to play.

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Gimme Shelter by the Rolling Stones – How to Play

gimme shelterThe beginning Guitar section of Gimme Shelter, by The Rolling Stones, can be a bit of a challenge, but with a little practice, you’ll find it to be worth the effort.

Gimme Shelter, by The Rolling Stones, was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards for the 1969 record “Let It Bleed,” on which it appears as the opening song. It features an Open Tuning on the Guitar; in other words, the strings are tuned to an open chord, instead of the standard tuning.

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How to Play You Shook Me All Night Long, by AC/DC

You Shook Me All Night Long by AC/DCYou Shook Me All Night Long, by AC/DC, is a straightforward, well known song that’s easy to play, making it great for beginners as well as practiced vets.

You Shook Me All Night Long, from the Australian Rock & Roll band AC/DC, was released in 1980 for the album “Back In Black.” It was their first single, and featured lead singer Brian Johnson who was replacing Bon Scott, who had passed away earlier. This is a very well known song that is pretty straightforward and easy to play, making it great for beginners.

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Rock Telecaster Bridge Pickups- Which Ones are Best?

rock telecaster bridge pickupsHere are some great replacement bridge pickups that have been designed for playing Rock with a Fender Telecaster.

Rock Telecaster Bridge Pickups

The Fender Telecaster is actually a great guitar for Rock. The twangy sound fattens up nicely when run through some overdrive or a fuzz pedal. Even though many people consider the Telecaster to be a country guitar many great Rock players, including Jeff Beck, Mike Campbell, John 5, Richie Kotzen, Alex Lifeson, Jimmy Page, Keith Richards, and Bruce Springsteen often use a Tele. One way that you might be able to help your Telecaster deliver a more Rock tone is to change the pickups. So, with that in mind, let’s talk about some of the best Rock Telecaster bridge pickups around.

The ones that we’ve listed here are of very high quality, and they were designed for Rock and for the great gain that they produce. So that means that we’ll be looking at humbucker pickups, which will allow us to run through overdrive or fuzz while keeping inherent noise to a minimum. We’ll be looking at pickups that fit into the bridge position of a Tele without having to modify the guitar, taking into account the slanted nature of its bridge pickup. So, if you’re looking to get a heavier rock sound, this list of the best Rock Telecaster bridge pickups should help you narrow down your choices.

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What are the Best Rock Stratocaster Pickups?

best rock stratocaster pickupsIf you’re a Rock or Heavy Metal Stratocaster guitar player looking to upgrade and improve your sound, check out this list of the best Rock pickups for the Strat.

Perhaps your guitar tone is getting stale, or perhaps it never sounded that good to begin with. Well, before you buy a new one, review this post and put some thought into upgrading your pickups instead. If you play Rock or Metal through a Stratocaster then this information should be especially useful to you. In making our selections for best Rock Stratocaster pickups, we looked at a number of things. For example, since Rock guitar players are probably going to use a lot of overdrive and distortion, they’ll need a high output pickup capable of delivering a lot of voltage to the amplifier, to push the preamp harder for a better-sounding overdrive. But, lots of overdrive and distortion can also be very noisy, especially in a Strat, with its stock single coil pickups.

You might also like this HumbuckerSoup article: What are the Best Blues Stratocaster Pickups?

So, because noise is a serious issue, it’s probably best to use a humbucking pickup. For those who don’t know, a humbucking pickup is two coils working together to cancel out noise and just leave the pure guitar signal, in much the same way a balanced XLR mic cable does. Because a humbucker is two coils, we need those that can fit into a single coil space. Of course, all of the other things that you might look for in a pickup — such as even, clear tone across all strings — are still important. So, all that said, here are what we consider to be some strong candidates for the best Rock pickups for the Strat.

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What is the Best Rock Guitar Combo Amplifier?

best rock guitar combo amplifierNeed a high gain combo amplifier? From Marshall to Peavey, this list is a great starting point for the Rock guitarist looking for a tube combo amp.

The combo amp is pretty standard equipment for guitarists of every music genre and skill level. Their compact and rugged design, and often reasonable purchase price, are sure to keep the combo amps going strong well into the future. So, what’s the best Rock guitar combo amplifier? Well, in this post, we’ll concentrate on combo amps that were designed to play Rock and Heavy Rock. Of course, we want the clean sounds to be clear and lush, but the gain, crunch, and distortion are going to be very important elements to this discussion, because of their emphasis in this style of music.

The music in this genre also often switches from a clean tone to a heavy distortion and then back again sometimes several times in a single song, and at a moment’s notice. This means that we are probably going to be looking for a two-channel amp (one clean, one distorted), preferably with the ability to switch channels using a footswitch. Because most people would probably agree that tubes sound better than solid state even in a modern Rock context, these amps will all be tube amps.
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