Making Double Coil Guitar Pickups: Building Your Own Electric Guitar Pickups – Part 4

making double coil guitar pickupsBuild your own double coil guitar pickup.

In the last article we talked about building our own single coil pickup, so this time, we’ll talk about making double coil guitar pickups. If you missed the single coil article, you can check it out here: Building Your Own Electric Guitar Pickups – Part 3. Continue reading “Making Double Coil Guitar Pickups: Building Your Own Electric Guitar Pickups – Part 4”

Making Single Coil Guitar Pickups – Building Your Own Electric Guitar Pickups – Part 4

making single coil guitar pickupsMaking single coil pickups can be very rewarding, easily done, and parts can be easily acquired.

Making Single Guitar Pickups

In this article, we’re going to talk about making single guitar pickups, and how building them from scratch can be such a rewarding and worthwhile experience. The design is simple and the steps easy to follow. Another benefit of the design is that winding the coil by hand offers the opportunity of having your pickup sound just as good as, if not better than, the same coil wound by a machine. Continue reading “Making Single Coil Guitar Pickups – Building Your Own Electric Guitar Pickups – Part 4”

Push-Pull Pot FAQ – Coil-Splitting a Humbucker Pickup

push-pull pot faqIf you've ever thought of using a push-pull pot to split a humbucker pickup, you may have questions; here are our most popular push-pull pot FAQs.

Push-pull pot FAQ: What is a coil-split pickup?

Push-pull pot FAQ often include inquiries into coil-splitting a humbucker pickup. A coil-split pickup is a humbucker that is split in such a way that it only uses one of its two coils. This is useful to guitarists who use humbuckers but occasionally want a single-coil sound.

Continue reading “Push-Pull Pot FAQ – Coil-Splitting a Humbucker Pickup”

Pickup Parts Needed – Building Your Own Electric Guitar Pickups – Part 3

pickup partsLearn about all of the tools and parts you'll need to build your own electric guitar pickup.

Hello again, and welcome to our ongoing series of articles discussing how guitar pickups work and how you can build your own. In the last article we discussed how the magnets and coil work, and how they work together to create the sound that you hear. This time around, we are going to look at the tools, pickup parts, and other things that you will need to build your project from scratch.
Continue reading “Pickup Parts Needed – Building Your Own Electric Guitar Pickups – Part 3”

Windings and How They Affect Tone & Output – Building Your Own Electric Guitar Pickups – Part 2

windingsLearn how windings change string vibrations, thereby affecting the tone and output of a guitar pickup.

In the last article we discussed all of the different guitar pickups available to the guitar player. So, we should now have a good idea why we would use each type and we should also have a rough idea of how each type works. And from that last article, we probably also remember that the most popular kind of guitar pickup is the passive type, and that it uses a magnet and the windings of a wire coil to create your sound. Continue reading “Windings and How They Affect Tone & Output – Building Your Own Electric Guitar Pickups – Part 2”

Understanding How Pickups Work – Building Your Own Electric Guitar Pickups – Part 1

how pickups workIf you would like to learn more about guitar pickups, what the different types are, how they are created, how they work, and even how to build your own, then this is the place to get started.

This is the first in a series of articles in which we will detail every aspect of the guitar pickup. We’ll discuss, with as much detail as possible, how pickups work, the different types, and when to use each. So, let’s get started. Continue reading “Understanding How Pickups Work – Building Your Own Electric Guitar Pickups – Part 1”

Modifying Your Tele for Nashville Style Wiring

nashville style wiringIf you'd like to add a dash of “Strat” tone to your Tele, you've come to the right place! In this article, we'll help you set up your Tele for Nashville Style wiring.

So, first things first. What is the Nashville Style Tele, how is it wired, and can you can modify your Telecaster so it produces its tone?

A Nashville Style Tele is just a Standard Telecaster with three pickups instead of two, and a five-way selector switch instead of a three-way selector switch. This Mod was created by Tele players looking to coax some Strat style tones out of their Telecaster while still retaining that crucial Neck + Bridge pickup combination not found on the Strat.

Continue reading “Modifying Your Tele for Nashville Style Wiring”

Guitar Pickup Wiring: Phase, Series, and Parallel

guitar pickup wiringHere's a look at guitar wiring, and how to make sure your pickups are in-phase with each other. Here, also, is an examination of polarity and how to wire pickups in series, or parallel.

So we’ll start with the basics of guitar pickup wiring by examining what it means when guitar pickups are wired in-phase, out-of-phase, series, or parallel. The first thing we’ll need to do is understand a little about how our pickups are made and how they work.

Continue reading “Guitar Pickup Wiring: Phase, Series, and Parallel”

Can I Split a Humbucker With a Three-Way Switch?

three-way switchIf I have a humbucker in the bridge position of my Telecaster, can one of the coils be turned off with the three-way switch?

A reader asked about turning off one coil of the bridge humbucker in his Telecaster via the three-way switch. What he proposed is:

1. Neck pickup
2. Neck + one humbucker coil
3. Both humbucker coils

While I guess the answer might be technically “yes,” I am going to say the answer is in reality: “no.”

The reason is that we do not use “both coils” in the humbucker. We actually run one coil into the next coil, and it might be better to look at a humbucker as a Single Figure 8 Coil instead of two separate Single Coils. We can “split” the humbucker by running a (switchable) wire to Ground right where the one coil meets the other coil. This actually “shorts out” the second coil; it doesn’t shut it off.  So, in order to split the pickup we need a path to Ground. The three-way switch in a Telecaster is a “Hot Wire” that selects which of the Hot pickup leads to send to the Volume pot. There is no ground connection available and adding one will short out the entire guitar. Without a ground we cannot split the pickup.

Continue reading “Can I Split a Humbucker With a Three-Way Switch?”

Les Paul Three-Way Switch Wiring – Basic Guitar Electronics

les paul three-way switchNow let's take a look at wiring up a three-way toggle switch in a Gibson Les Paul style guitar, and while we’re at it, we'll talk about the rest of the wiring.

We’re going to take a look at Les Paul three-way switch wiring, and because Gibson electronics are different than what we have been looking at so far, we’ll take a look at the rest of the circuit as well. We’ll look at the two humbuckers, the three-way switch, two Volume controls, two Tone controls, two capacitors, and the output jack.

Continue reading “Les Paul Three-Way Switch Wiring – Basic Guitar Electronics”